Quote on being done

Science isn’t about being right every time, or even most of the time. It is about being more right over time and fixing what it got wrong. (Scott Adams, Sciences biggest fail)

Sometimes, some things are just never done. You just need to iterate until the result is not perfect nor complete, but good enough for your customer.

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A choosing paradox: the more options, the less changes

When I was a child, Spanish broadcasting world was limited to just two TV channels. The First One and The Second One (not very original names, by the way).

TheFirst_and_TheSecond_logos

Every children my age remembers how, during San Isidro and San Fermin festivals, at mid-afternoon, the cartoons and series for kids that The First One transmitted everyday, were replaced by bullfighting. So every children arriving at home after school had to choose one of two options: Watch bullfighters or watch history and art documentaries on The Second One.

And that is the choosing paradox. I had so few options, I needed to choose something new. This way I discovered I didn’t like bullfighting, but I also found out I like history a lot.

Nowadays, I’ve so many channels available, I don’t need to watch anything I don’t feel like to.

YomviSo I end up watching the same as always. The same type of movies, the same type of series, or, worst case scenario, the same old chapters of the same old series again and again. I can always find on TV something I KNOW I LIKE, so I don’t need to watch anymore something I could eventually love.

Sometimes, the best way to taste something new is having very few options available.


  • Related: Choices = Headaches (joelonsoftware) “On many laptops, there are also four FN+Key combinations to power off, hibernate, sleep, etc. That brings us up to 13 choices, and, oh, yeah, there’s an on-off button, 14, and you can close the lid, 15. A total of fifteen different ways to shut down a laptop that you’re expected to choose from.”

Trying is harmful

Do, or do not. There is no try.
(Master Yoda, The Empire Strikes Back)

  • We’ll try to meet tomorrow
  • I’ll try to be on time
  • We try to improve every day
  • I’ll try not to let you down

The verb ‘to try‘ is the shield behind which we hide when we are not sure, when we don’t really feel like doing something, when we try to avoid uncertainty, when we don’t want to make a commitment.

The verb ‘to try‘ is a wild card, is the way we can walk through without burning any bridges.

Up to what point does inserting to try into the sentence affects our mood, our will, the results of our actions?

Are we doing our best when we are just trying? Or are our words leading to a path of failure?

How different do the words sound when we rule the lack of commitment, the laziness and the fear out!

  • We’ll meet tomorrow
  • I’ll be on time
  • We improve every day
  • I won’t let you down

How different do they sound when we stop trying and start doing!

Fast vs Cheap vs Good and the Covey Quadrant

GOOD CHEAP FAST: You can pick any two

As the sign says, you can offer three kinds of service:

  1. Good and Fast (and expensive)
  2. Good and Cheap (and slow)
  3. Bad, but cheap and fast

The sign says you must choose one of the three. Please, don’t.

If your company needs to be able to keep pace in the long run, if you want it to be a great place to work in, you simply CAN’T AFFORD the cost of offering cheap and fast BAD service.

Bad service will give you angry customers in the long run, when they’d forgotten about how cheap and fast you were, but everyday remembers how bad you were.

Fast and cheap is easy to do, as long as good is not a requirement. Besides, there always be one competitor out there who is willing to offer cheaper and faster bad service than yours.

By the way, here is Stephen Covey’s matrix.

sin-titulo

Quadrant 1, the important and urgent things, is what allows you to serve good and fast.

Quadrant 3 is representing cheap and fast service.

Nevermind about point 4. Just don’t do it.

Finally, quadrant 2, non urgent and important things, is what will give you the chance to offer good and cheap (in the long run).

coveygoodfastcheap

What quadrant of the matrix are you willing to live your life into?

Winning is overrated

OK, Jason. Failure is overrated.

The lessons learned from doing well give you a better chance at continuing your success. (Jason Fried, signalvsnoise.com)

But winning is too.

Sometimes you have no other option that losing. Your competition is far stronger than you. You are an amateur playing against a professional. You are in bad shape this season or in a wrong mood today. Or you don’t have enough experience… yet.

You are going to lose. But you won’t get shaper, nor stronger, you won’t reach pro level, nor acquire enough experience just by quitting.

Sometimes you just need to lose, and losing while making your best effort is far better than winning by default.

Quote: when everything is on fire, you’d better calm down

Men in Black. Jay, the rookie, have found out the problem and is doing everything he can, to solve it. Kay, the veteran, tells Jay off because Jay’s lost his temper.

Kay: We do not discharge our weapons in view of the public!
Jay: Man, we ain’t got time for this cover-up bullshit! I don’t know whether or not you’ve forgotten, but there’s an Arquillian Battle Cruiser that’s about to…
Kay: There’s always an Arquillian Battle Cruiser, or a Corillian Death Ray, or an intergalactic plague that is about to wipe out all life on this miserable little planet, and the only way these people can get on with their happy lives is that they DO NOT KNOW ABOUT IT!

Every workday you’ll need to put out some sort of fire. If you don’t calm down and think, you’ll be lost among the flames.
Things like planning or risk management were invented for these kind of emergencies. They’re not things you should get rid off when you are in ‘panic mode’. You can’t afford arriving late because of a shortcut you take.

When there is trouble ahead, think first, then act.
And if your job matters enough, there will always be trouble.

Why are you doing what you are doing (2)?

Matlab, the computing environment, had quite a nice sense of humor while presenting examples of applications to do with it. From drawing a penny to simulate the flushing flux of a toilet, a list of hidden commands will give you some interesting hints about how to use the environment.

But my favorite was always the why funcion. I could imagine a pair of mathematicians implementing the environment, reaching a dead-end on a development or failing to find the origin of a bug on the software. They both ask why the system is failing. Why they can’t find the error. Why do they need to implement this part of the system in the first place. Why. Why! WHYYYY!!!

And then, one told the other, “Wouldn’t it be awesome if there where an automatic way for finding it out?”. And the other one smiled. “Let’s work on it”.

Matlab’s why function is just a random generator of answers to this typical question. Things like “Because she asked some system manager” or “Because Bill wanted it this way”.

The funny idea and the random answers don’t hide the fact that we need to know why. Besides, we need to ask why. We need to know if we’re doing what we should be doing.

If you’re not doing it because of this, maybe you should stop doing it. And start doing the right thing you only can do.

In fact, one of the randomly-generated answers to Matlab’s why function is “Don’t you have something better to do?”