Trying is harmful

Do, or do not. There is no try.
(Master Yoda, The Empire Strikes Back)

  • We’ll try to meet tomorrow
  • I’ll try to be on time
  • We try to improve every day
  • I’ll try not to let you down

The verb ‘to try‘ is the shield behind which we hide when we are not sure, when we don’t really feel like doing something, when we try to avoid uncertainty, when we don’t want to make a commitment.

The verb ‘to try‘ is a wild card, is the way we can walk through without burning any bridges.

Up to what point does inserting to try into the sentence affects our mood, our will, the results of our actions?

Are we doing our best when we are just trying? Or are our words leading to a path of failure?

How different do the words sound when we rule the lack of commitment, the laziness and the fear out!

  • We’ll meet tomorrow
  • I’ll be on time
  • We improve every day
  • I won’t let you down

How different do they sound when we stop trying and start doing!

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Short run vs long run

Lisbon is quite a beautiful city, with a beautiful past.

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It seems that Marques’ pastry shop was thought, many years ago, as a business in the long run. So long that, at least, one other store has taken over.

Very few business, if someone at all, will today be built on stone. Flexibility and fastness have overcome stability and steadiness.

You will need many work hours, and a municipal permit, to erase Marques’ name from the main entrance. But you can replace the Stradivarius nameplate in a matter of minutes.

Sometimes you just can’t chose betting on robustness, and have to work on speed and readiness for change instead.

But I can’t help thinking how nice it must have been working with Mister Marques.

 

Why are you doing what you are doing (2)?

Matlab, the computing environment, had quite a nice sense of humor while presenting examples of applications to do with it. From drawing a penny to simulate the flushing flux of a toilet, a list of hidden commands will give you some interesting hints about how to use the environment.

But my favorite was always the why funcion. I could imagine a pair of mathematicians implementing the environment, reaching a dead-end on a development or failing to find the origin of a bug on the software. They both ask why the system is failing. Why they can’t find the error. Why do they need to implement this part of the system in the first place. Why. Why! WHYYYY!!!

And then, one told the other, “Wouldn’t it be awesome if there where an automatic way for finding it out?”. And the other one smiled. “Let’s work on it”.

Matlab’s why function is just a random generator of answers to this typical question. Things like “Because she asked some system manager” or “Because Bill wanted it this way”.

The funny idea and the random answers don’t hide the fact that we need to know why. Besides, we need to ask why. We need to know if we’re doing what we should be doing.

If you’re not doing it because of this, maybe you should stop doing it. And start doing the right thing you only can do.

In fact, one of the randomly-generated answers to Matlab’s why function is “Don’t you have something better to do?”